Latest Posts

best places to visit in florida

-
best places to visit in florida,florida,10 best places to visit in florida,places to visit in florida,places to go in florida,most beautiful places to visit in florida,visit florida,best places to visit,best places to live in florida,florida keys,things to do in florida,florida travel,5 best places to visit in florida,best places to visit in florida for couples

best places to visit in florida

Uncover the unexpected variety of the USA’s Sunshine State.
 Florida. That means Disney, right? In 1959, Walt Disney chose the city of Orlando to be the location of his new holiday resort, although he did not live to see Walt Disney World open its doors to visitors for the first time in 1971. Since then, The City Beautiful has become the global capital of theme parks. From pirates and princesses to wizards and whales, there’s an Orlando theme park to suit every taste. Millions of visitors each year choose between the gargantuan complexes of Disney, Universal Studios, SeaWorld and Legoland. If such vast and hyperactive theme parks aren’t your thing, try the smaller and more manageable Gatorland or Fun Spot America. Or maybe the Holy Land Experience, a Christian-based theme park, is more your thing?  
  Theme park fanatics who are prepared to go slightly further afield should also consider the African-influenced Busch Gardens, 128 kilometres (80 miles) west of Orlando in the outskirts of Tampa, while many drive 80 kilometres (50 miles) east to Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral to get up close to Space Shuttle Atlantis and a Saturn V rocket. For a peek behind the scenes, book one of the special tours of the launch complex.
  It’s possible to spend weeks hopping from one theme park to another across Florida’s central belt and many do but such an itinerary ignores Florida’s many and varied other attractions. Miami, probably the state’s most famous city, combines an American metropolis with Latin flair imagine the child of New York and Rio de Janeiro. The central district of Little Havana is probably where the Cuban influence is at its highest. Watch the locals play cards and dominos on fold-up tables in Gomez Park, and take an edible journey down the best cafes on Calle Ocho with a food tour.
  The museums of Downtown Miami are worth a visit, as are the hip and vibrant northern districts of Midtown and Upper Eastside; but most visitors actually spend a lot of their time on Miami Beach, a separate city located on a reef across Biscayne Bay. Here you can soak up the Art Deco architecture of Ocean Drive at the same time as soaking up the rays. Take time to wander the South Beach district, as busy at night as it is during the day, with hundreds of nightclubs, restaurants, boutiques and hotels, and a number of quirky, colourful lifeguard stands.
  South Beach may be among the most famous of American beaches, but there is no shortage of alternatives for those who want to avoid the crowds. With 2,000 kilometres (1,250 miles) of coastline, the Sunshine State nestles between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Those who want to try a spot of surfing could do worse than Laguna Beach on the strip of non-peninsula Florida known as the Panhandle. On the Atlantic coast, the hard sand of Daytona Beach was once used as a racecar track. Races ended when an internationally renowned racetrack was built in the city, but the beach is one of the few remaining that are still open to motorists albeit The historic heart of St Augustine is a fine place to soak up Spanish architecture at a slower speed. Further down the coast, West Palm Beach sits directly west of Grand Bahama and enjoys a similar reputation for snorkelling and sea life.
  Off the southern tip of the state, the Florida Keys is an archipelago of 1,700 islands stretching into the Gulf of Mexico. Many of them are linked by US Highway 1, which begins in Key West an island city at the tip of the Keys and stretches all the way to the Canadian border with Maine. Most will drive only the picturesque 260 kilometres (160 miles) section to Key West from Miami. If hiring a vehicle, try to get a convertible and, when you hit the first overwater section at Key Largo, let the roof drop and the sea breeze whistle through your hair. But don’t press too hard on the accelerator. The speed limit is strictly enforced and, anyway, the pace of life in the Keys is slow and steady. What’s the rush? Just don’t forget the fuel: gas for the car and local speciality Key lime pie for the driver.
  Another fine road trip from Miami is to take Highway 41 across the state. Once out of Miami’s urban sprawl, you’ll spend an hour traversing Everglades National Park. This vast tropical wilderness of wetland and forest is the result of slow-moving river water flowing into Florida Bay. Stop at the Shark Valley or Gulf Coast Visitor Center for a chance to take a ride on one of the iconic airboats that skim across the grass swamp. This spectacular ecosystem is home to crocodiles, manatees, plenty of snakes and the Florida panther. Also keep an eye on the sky for ospreys and the national animal of the USA, the bald eagle.
  Geographically, Florida is part of the Deep South, but it shares a relatively short land border only with Georgia and Alabama. It means that, conversely, Deep South culture is strongest the further north you go in the state. Here you’ll find traditional southern food, politics and values. Although both Florida’s state capital, Tallahassee, and biggest city, Jacksonville, can be found in the north, a better place to explore the region from is St Augustine. This small settlement was founded by Spanish explorer Pedro Menéndez de Avilés in 1565, making it the USA’s oldest city. It’s chock-full of Spanish-influenced historic buildings around a picturesque bay and lighthouse. Speaking of lighthouses, with such a long coastline to oversee, Florida is home to a surfeit of them, and visiting lighthouses has become a hobby akin to trainspotting. Key West and Ponce de Leon are home to two favourites beyond St Augustine.
  By all means fly to Orlando for a fix of Mickey Mouse and Harry Potter, but be sure to explore further afield. Florida is not an unfamiliar destination to holidaymakers, but those who escape beyond the theme parks will discover a surprising variety of riches in the Sunshine State.

Machu Picchu Tours

-

machu picchu,machu picchu peru,machu picchu tours,machu picchu hike,visit machu picchu,how to get to machu picchu,machu picchu (location),cusco to machu picchu,machu picchu tour,machu pichu,machu picchu trip,huayna picchu,machu picchu documentary,machu picchu train,machu picchu guide,machu picchu tickets,machu picchu tourism,getting to machu picchu,inca trail to machu picchu,cuanto cuesta machu picchu
Machu Picchu Tours

Explore Peru’s mighty Inca ruins nestled deep in the Andes mountain range.
  Machu Picchu is a sight to behold; a set of distinct stone ruins perched in the misty valleys of the Andes mountains. Dating back to the 15th century, the citadel is relatively young, and questions pertaining to how such large stones were transported up to 2,430 metres (7,972 feet) above sea level still shroud the ruins in mystery. This UNESCO World Heritage site attracts thousands of visitors each day, proving the fact that it remains one of the most intriguing and important archaeological sites to date.
  There are many features to the Machu Picchu citadel that still stand as stone structures today, though some are more complete than others. Taking a walk up the stone terraces and through the Old City Gate, you get a true sense of what might have happened in this historic complex. Walking into the Ceremonial Centre and standing in the rooms that were once used by revered individuals such as astronomers, scientists and political figures, you become filled with an undeniable curiosity. The large open spaces and expansive views over the Andes is a sight that will stay with you for years after.
  Reaching Machu Picchu is no easy feat, and even opting for the most travel-friendly route still makes this a hard-to-reach destination. Accessible in a couple of ways, the most adventurous option is the famous 43-kilometre (26-mile) Inca Trail; a four-day trek that takes travellers through Peru’s Sacred Valley and across scenic foothills to experience other Incan ruins along the way, before finally reaching Machu Picchu. The other method, and one that is far less testing, is by reaching the small mountain town of Aguas Calientes via a train that departs from the small village of Ollantaytambo.    From there, hop on a dedicated bus up towards the Machu Picchu ruins just before sunrise for a photographic opportunity. Then, walk the rocky steps back down to Aguas Calientes for a more challenging descent.
  After exploring the main citadel, you can navigate around different routes to explore the various ruins from a different perspective. Why not make an ascent up a hill climb towards the Sun Gate, once the original entrance into the Machu Picchu complex? Cross over to the adjacent mountain and climb up Huayna Picchu (also written as Wayna Picchu), where at the top you can take a moment to experience spectacular panoramic views over Machu Picchu and surrounding valleys of the vast Andes mountain range.
  Entrance into the Machu Picchu complex will cost around £35 ($45) per person. It’s important to bear in mind that there is a 2,500-person limit per day, so booking in advance is vital. If you’re planning on climbing Huayna Picchu as well, a combined ticket will cost you around £46 ($60), but there are even fewer of these available, with restrictions to certain times of the day (more information on this can be found by visiting www.machupicchu.gob.pe).
  Visiting Machu Picchu and walking the Inca Trail is a truly unforgettable experience that will make your South American trip one to remember forever.

Things To Do In Cancún

-
things to do in cancun,things to do in cancun mexico,things to do,cancun things to do,what to do in cancun,things to do in mexico,things to do playa del carmen,top things to do in playa del carmen,playa del carmen things to do,what to do in playa del carmen,things to do in cancún,fun things to do in cancun,top things to do in cancun,free things to do in cancun

Things To Do In Cancún

A famous holiday spot, Mexico’ Cancún offers sun, nightlife and archaeological wonders.
  The lure of the crystal-blue Caribbean Sea, the wonder of the ancient Mayan civilisation, and neon nightlife that is second to none make the charm of Cancún a worldfamous resort on the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico irresistible.
  Cancún, first developed as a tourism mecca in the 1970s, has grown in popularity among holidaymakers, and the reasons are many. Sparkling sandy beaches and the stunning Caribbean provide the setting for a variety of water sports, including diving, parasailing, riding watercraft, and exploring neighbouring islands by boat. Shopping, fine dining and a round of golf are appealing options as well.
  The breathtaking archaeological history of the Maya, one of the world’s oldest cultures, is explored by thousands annually. Accommodations are plentiful in the Cancún Hotel Zone, and range from unsurpassed luxury to economical. After dark, a vibrant club scene brings local culture and top entertainment to life, with stunning shows featuring dancers, acrobats and other performers.
  Located on the southeast coast of the Mexican Yucatán in the state of Quintana Roo, Cancún is famous the world over for its variety and spice of life. Getting there is relatively simple, Travellers are required to have a passport and tourism card, which is available through your airline of choice, any Mexican consulate, or the Mexican tourism office. Daily air service is available via Cancún International Airport. Take a taxi from the airport to the Hotel Zone, approximately 24 kilometres (15 miles) away. Accommodations in the Hotel Zone range from all-inclusive resorts to clean inexpensive rooms for travellers on a budget.
  The primary thoroughfare in the hotel zone is Avenue Kukulkan, lined with shops and restaurants, and often crowded with vendors and pedestrians. Spend the day soaking up the spectacular Caribbean sun at Playa Tortugas, a popular beach among locals and visitors alike, where refreshments are just a short walk away. The pristine sands of Playa Delfines offer a beach less travelled, with little commercial development and a quieter setting.
  For those interested in Mayan culture, the El Rey ruins are located in the centre of the Hotel Zone. Dating to 1200 CE, they are easily accessible and offer a taste of the rich heritage of the Yucatán. Other Mayan historical sites are nearby, but for the more adventurous, the great city of Chichen Itza, with its famed step pyramids, lies just two hours to the west. Excursions are available, but they sell out quickly.
  Outlying Islands, such as Isla Mujeres, offer charms all their own. A lovely fishing village just 20 minutes by ferry from Cancún, the town and island provide ecotourism adventures such as the turtle farm at Sac Bajo, diving and snorkelling at El Garrafon, and encounters such as swimming with dolphins.
  Of course, the Cancún nightlife is second to none, and opportunities for an evening of diversion abound. Cancún has largely escaped the drug-related issues that have plagued other areas of Mexico in recent years. However, stay within the designated areas and remember to guard valuables and personal possessions. Law enforcement personnel are visible and active.

Things To Do In Ometepe

-
ometepe,ometepe island,ometepe nicaragua,ferry to ometepe,things to do in nicaragua,ometepe island nicaragua,things to do on ometepe,things to do ometepe,things to do on isla ometepe,how to get to ometepe,isla ometepe,what to do in ometepe,ometepe island in nicaragua,what to do ometepe,best things to do in leon,where to stay in ometepe,ometepe island things to do,what to do isla ometepe

Things To Do In Ometepe

The volcanic island of Ometepe rises from Lake Nicaragua in the Central American country.
  An island of reverence and awe since ancient times, Ometepe rises from the depths of Lake Nicaragua, which dominates the southwestern region of the Central American nation of Nicaragua, brushing against the coastline of the Pacific Ocean.  
  The crown jewel of two magnificent volcanoes, Concepcion and Maderas, Ometepe encompasses 276 square kilometres (107 square miles), the world’s largest island situated in a freshwater lake. Its shape resembles an hourglass, two distinct islets joined by a small isthmus. The two grand volcanoes tower above the landscape and lakeside vistas. In the northwest, Concepcion reaches 1,609 metres (5,280 feet) elevation, while in the southeast Maderas soars to 1,394 metres (4,574 feet). 
  A vision of paradise for its pre-Columbian native peoples, Ometepe indeed remains a place of natural beauty seldom seen anywhere else. Dense jungle conceals its wealth of waterfalls, beautiful springs and abundant wildlife, but those who venture to Ometepe are rewarded with the experience of a lifetime. Hikers, birdwatchers and nature enthusiasts of every description find fulfilment in a variety of activities, and the entire island is designated a UNESCO biosphere reserve. Challenging hikes through the rainforest trails and up the slopes of Concepcion or Maderas require from seven to ten hours. However, the rewards are stunning. The ancient Maderas crater is today a lagoon, while the summit of Concepcion offers panoramic, unrestricted views of the island and its surroundings.
  Ecotourism thrives on Ometepe, and watercraft travel back and forth to the mainland several times a day, docking at the port town of Moyogalpa, where amenities are readily available. This includes hotel accommodations or more inexpensive hostel-style lodgings, as well as restaurants, refreshments and stores where necessities may be procured. Car, motorcycle and bicycle rental companies operate there as well. The most expedient route to Ometepe is the boat from the town of San Jorge, and the one-way trip requires about an hour. The fare is inexpensive at about £1.50 ($2). A larger ferry from the town of Granada is not quite as dependable as the San Jorge schedule, running twice a week to the northern town of Altagracia. Overland distance between Moyogalpa and Altagracia is 24 kilometres (15 miles).
  The nature reserve of Charco Verde is located near Altagracia, and visitors become acquainted with the native species, including howler monkeys, boa constrictors and a variety of birds. The reserve lagoon is a quiet place of mangrove trees casting light and shadow across the waters, and always under the watchful gaze of the dominant volcanoes. Hotel accommodations, shops and restaurants thrive in Altagracia, where the pre-Columbian heritage of Ometepe is celebrated in a museum that houses examples of ceramics, statues and ancient carvings well worth a visit.
  Stopping off at Santo Domingo Beach en route to Altagracia is a pleasant diversion for an afternoon, and other beautiful beaches are accessible along the road connecting the two sides of Ometepe. On the southwestern slope of Maderas lie the enchanting villages of San Ramón and Mérida. Both are adjacent to Lake Nicaragua, and San Ramón is famous for its breathtaking waterfall.

Banff National Park

-
banff national park,banff,things to do in banff national park,national park,jasper national park,banff canada,banff national park 4k,banff national park canada,banff gondola,things to do in banff canada,banff national park vlog,canada banff national park,winter in banff national park,things to do in banff,national,banff alberta canada,banff attractions,banff alberta,banff springs hotel,banff vacation

Banff National Park

Canada’s great outdoors is begging to be explored in this natural wonderland.
  With its turquoise lakes, colossal pines and snow-capped mountains, Banff National Park’s natural beauty makes it a recognisable location. Canada’s first national park draws crowds from around the world, but its size and variety make it the ideal place to reflect on nature’s majesty in peace.
  Situated high in Alberta’s Rocky Mountains, Banff town is where many journeys through the national park begin. The main thoroughfare is Banff Avenue, where hotels, restaurants, cafés and shops compete for business from the many tourists.
  It’s easy to reach many of Banff’s best attractions from the town, including Bow Falls, a scenic hike less than half an hour away on foot. Also nearby is the famous Banff Springs Hotel. This grand structure was built by Canadian Pacific Railway in 1914, and resembles a giant castle in the mountains. Luxury is an understatement here there are 11 restaurants on site, a 27-hole golf course and a spa with its own waterfalls. That’s not to mention the 757 stylish rooms, many of which boast sensational views of the surrounding wilderness.
  Don’t worry if you don’t have the holiday budget to stay in such opulent accommodation Banff is an unforgettable place whether you’re inhabiting a tent or a palace. Lake Louise personifies the beauty of the area like nowhere else, its shimmering emerald surface providing the muse for infinite Insta-worthy photographs. Louise is only the most famous of the many mesmerising lakes found throughout Banff National Park. 14 kilometres (nine miles) away, Moraine Lake’s glacially fed waters provide an alternative spot for reflective wandering. Canoeing on either lake is an unforgettable experience the quietest time to go is in the evening, when day-trippers disappear and leave you to enjoy the splendour uninterrupted.
  For hiking, Johnston Canyon provides options for all abilities. A quick and easy walk can be had by making your way to the lower falls, while those who wish to be challenged can continue climbing to the upper falls and the canyon beyond.  
  Prefer to enjoy nature spotting without the  exertion of trekking? Take a ride on Banff Gondola. This will take you to the summit of Sulphur Mountain, where you can meander along the mountain boardwalk and 360-degree observation deck while marvelling at the spectacular views around you.  
  Another appealing option is skiing. Banff has some of the best slopes in Canada, and if you visit during winter you can enjoy gliding through perfect powder in one of three resorts: Lake Louise, Sunshine and Mt. Norquay. Ice skating is a more leisurely option, and can be enjoyed at Chateau Lake Louise. Complete with its own ice castle, a whizz around the rink here makes you feel like you’ve stepped into your own frozen fairy tale.

Best Places To Visit In California

-
best places to visit in california,california,best places in california,10 best places to visit in california,best places to live in california,places to visit in southern california,what to do in california,best places to visit,top 10 best places to visit in california,visit california,things to do in california,places to visit in california,best place visit in california

Best Places To Visit In California

Drive across one of America’s most diverse states to experience film stars, desert land and more.
  California is the USA’s most-populated state with nearly 40 million inhabitants covering close to 1,300 kilometres (800 miles) of land. The Golden State stretches all the way from the Mexican border in the south to where it joins the state of Oregon. It is also home to some of America’s most beautiful National Parks, biggest cities and stunning coastal roads.
  California is a place where you can easily spend a whole month exploring the sights and cities, whether you prefer the great outdoors or the urban centres. From high, snowy altitudes in the north of the state around Lake Tahoe, to the desert wastelands of Death Valley further south along the border with Nevada, California is as diverse in culture as it is in scenery.
  There is so much to see and do that you should plan for at least two to three weeks here to see the majority of what’s on offer. The hardest decision to make is where to start. Flying into Los Angeles Airport, get stuck in to urban culture, Hollywood lifestyle and Californian cuisine. This massive city is home to Beverly Hills, some amazing beaches like Huntington Beach and Long Beach, and a host of incredible architectural marvels and museums.
  It’s highly recommended that you hire a car to get the most out of your trip. Head north out of Los Angeles and up to the coastal road that is known as Big Sur. Stopping off at Santa Barbara, you’ll feel like you’ve been transported into the Mediterranean, in a city that reveals its Spanish colonial past within the stucco-style buildings and a warm sea breeze.
  Driving along Big Sur on the Pacific Coast Highway is a visually rewarding journey, showing off many cliffs, beaches and ocean views that will make you want to turn around and drive it back again. Just over a four-hour drive away from Santa Barbara is the incredible Sequoia National Park, home to some of the world’s largest trees from the Redwood family, the giant sequoia trees. Some of the largest sequoias are big enough to have tunnels cut through them for pedestrians to walk under. Heading up further north and through the Sierra National Forest, you can make camp in the spectacular Yosemite National Park, an area of stunning natural beauty that should not be left out of your itinerary.
  A trip to California can’t go without a visit to San Francisco, the hilly city that features the notorious Alcatraz prison, now a historical landmark and tourist site, as well as the impressive Golden Gate Bridge that dominates the skyline crossing over the Pacific Ocean. When visiting San Francisco, take a stroll into Fisherman’s Wharf for souvenir shopping, seal watching along the harbour’s edge, and great local cuisine and fish markets.
  Head once again onto the open road to get back in touch with nature by exploring an incredible line-up of national parks and forests. It’s possible to experience ski resorts and sandy beaches all in one place in Tahoe National Forest, 160 kilometres (100 miles) east from the state capital of Sacramento. Because of such varying altitudes, weather conditions can change dramatically, so be prepared for every eventuality.
  Driving south along the Californian border with Nevada, you’ll reach the vast expanse that is Death Valley National Park; a place of extreme temperature and desert landscapes that will take any hardened traveller by surprise. Dropping below sea level in parts, and featuring incredibly harsh terrain, you will leave thinking you weren’t in California at all, but perhaps on another planet! Venturing further south into the desertlike Joshua Tree National Park, explore a vast expanse of wilderness that’s home to a number of exciting flora and fauna, including the Joshua tree, a plant that is unique to only this part of the world.
  San Diego is California’s most southerly city and one that deserves a long weekend exploring its sights and attractions. Spend a day at the San Diego Zoo located in Balboa Park, a massive complex with gardens consisting of Spanish Renaissance architecture in the downtown area. Hop aboard the USS Midway Museum for a historic flight centre featuring simulators and restored aircrafts, and take time to explore San Diego at night to see how the city comes to life after hours.

Visit Fernando de Noronha

-
fernando de noronha,noronha,fernando de noronha (geographical feature),fernando de noronha travel,o que fazer em fernando de noronha,fernando,dicas de noronha,english in fernando de noronha,fernado de noronha,fernando de noronha surf,fernando de noronha brand,fernando de noronha (island),fernando de noronha brazil,what to do in fernando de noronha,fernando de noronha 4k drone

Visit Fernando de Noronha

Fernando de Noronha
Find your own piece of paradise in this remote Brazilian archipelago.
  Almost 2,500 kilometres (1,500 miles) away from the busy beaches of Copacabana sits Brazil’s true tropical dreamscape: the 21 islands that make up Fernando de Noronha. Dramatic, almost vertical mountains (think Sugar Loaf in Rio) meet azure, crystalline waters, bordered by dazzling white sand and verdant palm trees. You won’t find the tourist crowds and their coconut cocktails here, either the islands are a Maritime National Park, dutifully protected by Brazilian law.
  The islands are actually the summits of submerged mountains, which explains their unusual landscape. But because they are so far away from the South American mainland, these jaw-droppingly beautiful islands have remained largely uninhabited - even today, only about 5,000 people live there. Because of the lack of human activity, all kinds of plants and animals have been able to thrive in the island's climate and rich ecosystem. If you're a budding David Attenborough, you'll be able to identify sea turtles, whales, albatrosses and many more, some of which are totally unique to the area.
  In fact, Charles Darwin himself stopped at the islands during his famous Beagle voyage, and was astonished by what he found. “The whole island is one forest and this is so thickly intertwined that it requires great exertion to crawl along. The scenery was very beautiful, and large magnolias and trees covered with delicate flowers ought to have satisfied me.”
  Nearly 200 years later, the natural beauty that so entranced Darwin is still to be found on the islands today. Immerse your senses in the islands’ jungle, and always be on the lookout for exotic animals and plants you may find along the way.
  Or, head out onto one of many perfect praias (beaches), such as Sancho or Conceição, and discover the marine life swimming about in the shallows - if you don your snorkel, you're sure to see a rainbow of fish and plants. Go deeper with a dive tour of the islands, and you might be lucky enough to get close to rare dolphins and turtles. You shouldn't even need a diving suit - the waters are warm, and visibility can reach as far as 50 metres (164 feet).
  If you’d prefer to simply sit back and soak up the tranquillity, you’ll find there’s plenty of space on the sand for your towel and suncream. Because tourist numbers are heavily limited to preserve the fragile ecosystem, people are few and far between it’ll be like your own desert island retreat.
  Getting to Fernando de Noronha is an adventure all by itself, so it’s only for the intrepid! Tourist numbers are limited to just 500 people per day, so you need to do your research to find out how you can become one of these lucky few. You’ll have to fly from the cities of Recife or Natal, and while Noronha’s hotels are stunning, they are expensive. It’s also worth mentioning that tourists have to pay a daily tax to be on the island (about £11/$15 per day), as well as a tax to enter the national park (roughly £30/$40 daily) so the costs can mount up.
  However, if visiting this dream destination is top of your list, then money won’t matter when you’re walking barefoot on the sand, free to act like no one else is around you because they really aren’t.

Best Places To Visit In The Caribbean

-
caribbean,best places to visit,best place to visit in the caribbean,the caribbean,best places in caribbean,best resorts in the caribbean,best beaches in the caribbean,best places to visit i,best beaches in the caribbean 2018,best hotels in the caribbean,which islands to visit in caribbean,best all inclusive resorts in the caribbean,where to go in the caribbean

best places to visit in the caribbean

More than 7,000 islands await you in this slice of sunny, sandy paradise.
  The Caribbean is known throughout the world as a gorgeous, idyllic destination for a luxurious holiday with guaranteed good weather, stunning beaches and all the rum you can sip. This is true for pretty much all of the countries in the group bordering the Caribbean Sea, but the islands have so much more to offer than beaches and piña coladas. Although obviously you’ll want to make time to enjoy a few of those too while you’re out there!
  Many of the Caribbean countries’ economies are geared towards the tourism trade, so there are plenty of hotels, watersports and tours on offer, providing a range of choices in where to stay, what to do and how to do it. However, if you’re keen to discover the real, authentic Caribbean then you do have plenty of options as well on the less famous islands.
  As a starting point on your Caribbean journey, you could do an awful lot worse than following in the footsteps of Christopher Columbus. When he set sail to attempt to discover a western sea route to Asia, he stumbled across The New World first landing on San Salvador part of The Bahamas. There is a statue on the island commemorating his arrival in 1492 as well as a white cross marking the spot where he first stepped foot in the country. The Bahamas may be significantly different from Columbus’s time, but there are few better places to begin your Caribbean voyage. One essential stop is the unique and stunning Pink Sands Beach. This is exactly what its name suggests it is a glorious 4.8-kilometre (three-mile) stretch of beach where the sand is less golden and more pink, due to the red shells of tiny marine organisms called foraminifera that reside in the reefs. This natural wonder simply has to be seen to be believed.
  On the subject of reefs, the diving opportunities are plentiful around the Caribbean, but few places are as good as The Bahamas. The Andros Coral reef is the third-largest barrier reef in the world, and is teeming with exotic fish and beautiful, unspoiled coral. Tick something off the bucket list by swimming with dolphins in Dolphin Cay, or, if you fancy something a little more daring, sharks in Stuart Cove. The Bahamas is also home to the Lucayan National Park, which features the world’s longest underwater cave system. In the capital, Nassau, you’ll find a collection of colonial buildings, instantly transporting you back several centuries, while John Watling’s distillery is well worth a tour given that it is known as the ‘spirit of The Bahamas’. Last, but certainly not least, is Big Major Cay, 132 kilometres (82 miles) southeast of Nassau. The name Big Major Cay may not be familiar to you, but you’ve almost certainly heard of Pig Beach. With its soft, golden sand and clear turquoise waters, it is stunning enough in its own right but it separates itself from the myriad other idyllic beaches in the Caribbean by having around 20 pigs that love to splash in the shallows. No one quite knows how the pigs got there, but to swim with pigs in the crystal waters of The Bahamas is truly a once-ina-lifetime experience.
  Jamaica is another of the Caribbean’s most well-known islands, thanks in part to two iconic sporting disciplines. First is Olympic sprinting, second is the bobsleigh. A statue of multiple Olympic-gold-medal-winning sprinter Usain Bolt can be found in the capital, Kingston, while his hometown of Sherwood Content is worth a visit as the locals are more than happy to discuss one of their country's most famous world stars. And anyone who has seen Cool Runnings is surely still in love with the Jamaican bobsleigh team. You can re-create their famous journey with a one-kilometre (0.6-mile) bobsled run that speeds through the Dunn River Falls. You should also take the time to visit the falls themselves - a travertine waterfall that you are able to climb if you're feeling adventurous, or relax in if you're feeling more chilled.
  On the subject of chilling out, Jamaica is the home of reggae, and they sure are proud of it. Reggae music pours out of so many of the bars and restaurants on the island, but it’s always fresh, always fun and matches perfectly with the pace of life out there. Bob Marley is one of the island's greatest exports, and you can visit the Bob Marley Museum in Kingston. One more Jamaican gift to the world is Blue Mountain coffee - so don't miss out on a cup or two of java straight from the source. Jamaica is a relaxed, serene island that is a great spot to relax in, so a trip to the Floyd's Pelican Bar is a must. This is a driftwood shack 1.25 kilometres (0.75 miles) out to sea, where you can eat, drink and relax to the sounds of the waves lapping against the wooden struts - an experience unlike any other in the world.
  Barbados is yet another stunning island that your Caribbean trip wouldn’t be complete without visiting. It’s one of the smallest of the Caribbean countries, but packs an awful lot of character and history into its modest form. For British travellers, Barbados is something of a home from home just with an awful lot more sunshine. The Queen is still head of state in Barbados, and her portrait sits proudly at the airport as you arrive. The post boxes in Barbados are bright red, and everything from the greens to the quaint churches just scream Little England.
  Barbados is truly a nature-lover’s paradise, as there is so much to see and do both inland and on the coast. Hunte’s Garden is a highlight of the island a wonderful botanical garden set in a gully, full of plants unique to the island. Anthony Hunte, the horticulturalist behind the design, is often available for a chat and drink, providing visitors with a superb insight into this attraction. The capital of Bridgetown is home to a true natural wonder: a huge baobab tree that is so wide it takes 15 people to surround it. The tree is over 1,000 years old so be sure to drink in the age and majesty of this ancient tree while you’re in Bridgetown.
  Harrison’s Cave is a fascinating excursion, as a train takes you through a network of caves and tunnels, where you can gaze in awe at the stalagmites and stalactites that line its ceiling and floor. A trip to the Mount Gay or Foursquare Distillery is also something that should be high up on your agenda, as the sugar plantations and story of how rum became the national drink of the Caribbean is interesting and enjoyable.
  It’s difficult to talk about Barbados without mentioning its spectacular cricketing heritage. Despite having one of the smaller populations of the countries that make up the West Indies cricket team, it has produced many of its stars, including Gordon Greenidge, Desmond Haynes, Sir Garfield Sobers and the famous Three Ws: Sir Clyde Walcott, Sir Everton Weekes and Sir Frank Worrell. The Kensington Oval is one of the most beautiful Test grounds in the world, and is an essential location on any self-respecting cricket fan’s bucket list. Barbados truly is a gorgeous slice of Britishness thousands of miles away, so somewhere certainly worth considering if you like your home comforts.
  Saint Lucia maybe isn’t quite as well-known across the world as The Bahamas, Jamaica and Barbados, but it’s certainly one of the most glorious of all the Caribbean islands. If you only have the time for one stop, then you simply have to head to Soufrière. It may be small but it’s home to two of Saint Lucia’s most famous landmarks: Sulphur Springs (the world’s only drive-in volcano) and the Pitons. The Gros and Petit Pitons are the original twin peaks, rising 798 metres (2,619 feet) and 743 metres (2,468 feet) respectively, and are said to be the Caribbean’s most photographed site. Those who like a challenge can hike Gros Piton, while Petit Piton, despite being smaller, is more of a struggle. Once you’ve enjoyed the sights of the Pitons, head to Sulphur Springs, where you can drive your car right through the heart of the awe-inspiring volcano. Don’t worry, it’s a dormant volcano, giving you a danger-free view of the inside of one of nature’s most destructive forces. You can then finish off your trip with a mud bath in the mineral enriched pools in the shadow of the volcano before washing yourself down underneath the Toraille Waterfall. Soufrière is the only place in the whole of the Caribbean where natural wonders  like these exist.
  There are more than 7,690 hectares (19,000 acres) of gorgeous rainforest in Saint Lucia, packed with tropical plants and amazing views. And depending on your level of love of adventure, you can walk, take a gondola or even zipline through the lush land. After a long day of island adventure, take time to enjoy some of St Lucia’s delicious French and Creole-inspired cuisine.
  With so many countries and islands available to see and experience, we could go on forever explaining the sights, sounds and tastes available across the 7,000 islands, but what else is there to see and do around the Caribbean?
  The Dominican Republic is the region’s largest chocolate-producing country and a world leader in Fair Trade chocolate, so it’s definitely worth sampling the local delicacy.
  Trinidad and Tobago is one of the most developed Caribbean islands, with the thirdhighest GDP in the Western Hemisphere, which makes it a wholly different experience to the rest of the area. It’s well-known for its delicious street food at reasonable prices (given the country’s wealth), and it’s also renowned as a birdwatcher’s paradise.
  One of the Caribbean’s prime locations for foodies is Saint Martin, which has a range of more than 40 restaurants stretching the length of the beach front in Grand Case. On the subject of food and drink, most islands will have a main rum distillery, and many of those will offer fascinating tours of the rum production process, plus a trip through row upon row of sugar cane. Fish fries are also a Caribbean-wide tradition, with stalls lining up every Friday to whip up delicious fried fish and shellfish. They’re wonderful community occasions with music and dancing as well as delicious food. If you fancy working for your supper, you can go for a ‘dive and dine’ experience on the small island of Nevis. Scuba dive for lobster and if you’re successful learn how to cook it for a delicious dinner.
  Puerto Rico underwent a transformation in the wake of the devastating 2017 hurricane. New restaurants, hotels and activities have sprung up, attracting the holidaymaker types who like their modern luxuries.
  Pretty much every island in the Caribbean is awash with miles of beautiful beaches, but the best surfing is found at Eleuthera Surfer’s Beach in The Bahamas, Tortola in the British Virgin Islands, Rincon in Puerto Rico, and the ‘Soup Bowl’ in Barbados.
  The brochures for the Caribbean inevitably focus on the sandy beaches and luxurious resorts that make the area one of the biggest summer holiday destinations in the world. However, that is most certainly doing the islands that make up the Caribbean a huge disservice, given the wealth of culture, food, history, greenery, topography and activities. The Caribbean is vibrant, fascinating, temperate, welcoming and reasonably priced, as well as being visually stunning. Certainly, it is one of the world’s mustvisit destinations as there truly is something for every kind of holidaymaker, whether you are in the market for trekking, exploring the islands’ history, kicking back to some reggae music, or just relaxing on the beach with a piña colada. Just make sure the swimming pigs don’t steal  your drink!

Things To Do In New York

-
things to do in new york,new york,what to do in new york,things to do in new york city,new york city,what to do in new york city,things to do in nyc,new york travel guide,top things to do in new york,what to do in nyc,fun things to do in nyc,best things to do in nyc,new york travel,best things to do in new york,new york city travel guide

Things To Do In New York

New York City
There’s nowhere quite like New York, America’s epicentre of culture and commerce.
  Welcome to the city that never sleeps. New York is a vast metropolis where anything can happen one minute you’re taking in the neon-lit commercial mecca of Times Square, the next you’ll be sipping drinks in a trendy Brooklyn dive bar or strolling through acres of urban greenery in the iconic surrounds of Central Park.
  However you choose to begin your New York City adventure, arriving into town via Grand Central Terminal will ensure a suitably splendid entrance. The aptly named station (it’s both grand and central) houses elaborate architecture and artwork, providing its 700,000 daily commuters with an inspiring start and end to their journeys. Manhattan is New York City how you imagine it. Most of the Big Apple’s recognisable sites can be found here, including the Empire State Building. This towering landmark and its dazzling coloured lights can be enjoyed from the ground for free, but seeing the city from its 102nd floor observatory is an essential NYC experience.  From up here you can map out the city as the birds do, planning your route through its varied neighbourhoods while basking in the glow of a Manhattan sunset (it’s the best time to visit, as you’ll see the city transitioning from day to night). For the best view of the tower itself, try Top of the Rock at the Rockefeller Center, which is located directly opposite the Empire State Building and provides similarly spellbinding vistas of the city. 
  Continue to find your bearings with a walk along the High Line. What used to be an unsightly freight line through the Meatpacking District has become one of New York’s most appealing urban spaces a 2.4-kilometre (1.5-mile) stretch of green where you can take your time ambling across the city and admiring its sights from nine metres (30 feet) above the ground. Art installations, food vendors and some inspired landscaping make it easy to while away an afternoon enjoying views of the Hudson River.
  When you’re done with the razzle-dazzle of Manhattan, New York has four other boroughs to explore. Brooklyn is big enough to be its own city accessible by foot via the stately Brooklyn Bridge and it’s where you’ll find independent shops and bars in the hip neighbourhood of Williamsburg, kitsch coastal amusements in Coney Island, and verdant foliage in Brooklyn Botanic Garden.
  Sports fans will want to spend some time in Queens and the Bronx, home to two of America’s most legendary baseball teams. The Mets play at Citi Field in Queens, while the Yankees hit their home runs from Yankee Stadium in the Bronx. If you’d prefer to catch some fast-paced basketball, head to Madison Square Garden, where the Knicks shoot hoops.
  Taking the free ferry to Staten Island means you’ll catch sight of New York’s most recognisable landmark. The Statue of Liberty holds her torch aloft from her pedestal on Liberty Island, which is visible from the boat. For a closer look, take a trip to the island and enjoy a self-guided audio tour to learn about the history of this remarkable monument. Book tickets in advance if you want to step inside the statue and see New York from Lady Liberty’s crown.
  Museums in New York provide a cultural antidote to the touristy hubbub of its most famous sights. Perhaps the most noteworthy of these is the Metropolitan Museum of Art (known as the Met for short). Countless significant artworks fill the walls and halls of this vast museum, with highlights including a reconstruction of an Ancient Egyptian temple and priceless paintings from around the world. Its roof garden and bar provide the perfect place to relax between exhibitions, and contain sculptures by contemporary artists.
  The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) houses one of the world’s best collections of work by artists including Vincent van Gogh, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock and Roy Lichtenstein. If you’re still craving creative prowess after exploring its four levels, there’s the Guggenheim; the building is a masterpiece in itself, an inverted-ziggurat structure designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright.
  When you’ve filled your boots with art, the American Museum of Natural History showcases wonders of an entirely different kind. Kids and adults alike marvel at the feats of evolution inside this temple to Mother Nature, such as a  28.7-metre (94-foot) long blue whale suspended from the ceiling and more dinosaur skeletons than you can shake a prehistoric stick at.
  A more sobering experience (but no less vital) is to visit the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Here, a pair of square reflective pools surrounded by America’s largest manYou canwalk or cycle from Manhattan toBrooklyn via the Brooklyn Bridge Manhattan’s famous skyscrapers include the Empire State Building,the Chrysler Building and One World Trade Center made waterfalls mark the precise location where the Twin Towers once stood. Around each pool’s edge, the names of the 2,983 victims are inscribed into bronze parapets as a tribute to those who lost their lives.
  You’ll need to keep energy levels up with plenty of food while exploring New York’s sprawling neighbourhoods. As luck would have it, this city is one of the best places in the world for eating. Whether you choose to dine in style at one of NYC’s many Michelin-starred restaurants or keep it real with meals from street vendors, foodies will be in awe of the culinary variety that can be found here.
  Pizza is something of a speciality in New York, and there’s no shortage of quality outlets to grab a slice from. Some of the best include Grimaldi’s in Brooklyn and Lombardi’s in Little Italy. You’ll also want to grab a bagel while you’re in town; for this, try the smoked salmon and cream cheese number at Russ & Daughters. And what would breakfast in New York be without coffee? The city is awash with independent cafés you’ll barely walk two blocks without discovering one.
  But you shouldn’t confine yourself to purely local flavours during your stay in New York. There’s a whole world of cuisine here, with more than 200 different nationalities calling the city home. Make the most of this global microcosm by sampling as many delicacies as possible,  from steaming noodle bowls in Chinatown to mouthwatering pierogies in Little Poland.

roatan bay islands honduras

-
honduras,roatan,roatan honduras,bay islands,roatan island,roatan island honduras,roatan honduras cruise port,west bay,roatan bay islands honduras,honduras bay islands roatan,sailing bay islands honduras,roatan bay islands,roatan bay honduras vlog,roatán bay islands,west bay beach,islands,roatan travel,honduras bay islands,honduran bay islands,west bay roatan,west bay roatan island,west bay beach roatan

roatan bay islands honduras

Some of the world’s best diving awaits in the waters surrounding the Bay Islands of Honduras.
  The bright sunshine and the beautiful waters of the Bay Islands of Honduras beckon thousands of visitors annually to experience some of the world’s finest diving and snorkelling. The barrier reefs surrounding Roatán, Guanaja and Utila include a portion of the world’s second-largest such ecosystem. While lodging and dining expenses are somewhat higher than the Honduran mainland, visitors find that these are worth the investment to observe marine life on a grand scale, including abundant coral, fish, sponges, sea turtles and more. Once a part of the Spanish empire, the islands have been administered as one of 18 departments of the Republic of Honduras since 1872.
  Lying 15 to 60 kilometres (ten to 40 miles) off the Honduran coast in the Caribbean Sea, the popularity of the islands has increased substantially in recent years, and Roatán has become a particularly popular destination.
  The largest of the islands, Roatán offers all-inclusive resort packages along with guided diving excursions, hiking trails and beautiful beaches that invite visitors to relax and soak up the sun. Thrilling zip lines, encounters with jungle wildlife, and easy living are also abundant. The island is 60 kilometres (40 miles) long, and 14 kilometres (nine miles) across at its widest point. A long, curving ridgeline accents the tropical landscape, which challenges accomplished hikers but provides stunning vistas of the Caribbean for those willing to put in some legwork. Although hotel accommodation is sparse, good availability exists at West End Village, an eclectic enclave at the northwestern end of the island. Thriving commercial activity and shopping are also available at Coxen Hole, the largest city on Roatán.
  Utila is the smallest of the three Bay Islands; however, there are opportunities to learn diving and snorkelling skills at a reasonable rate. In fact, for budget-minded travellers Utila may be the best place to discover the captivating natural beauty of the Caribbean barrier reef. Utila is punctuated with mangrove swamps, and its main road traversing the entire island from Sandy Bay in the west to The Point on the eastern shore may be walked in only 20 minutes. Its population centre, Utila Town, is home to shops and restaurants, providing a real flavour of the unique Caribbean culture that makes the Bay Islands such a popular destination.
  The mountainous island of Guanaja receives fewer visitors. Consisting of two islets bisected by a canal, these spits of land are accessible from one another by water taxi. Bonacca, also called Guanaja Town, is the centre of the island's commerce. Shops offer a variety of local wares, and accommodation here - while relatively few - can be expensive.
  The Bay Islands of Honduras present an appealing Caribbean adventure for visitors. beckoning those who seek beauty in nature, colourful culture and an opportunity to experience the easy lifestyle that has made the area famous the world over. Remember that expenses for food and lodging vary widely. Credit card transactions are also subject to a hefty 16 per cent upcharge in some locales.

Atacama Desert

-
atacama desert,atacama,desert,san pedro de atacama,atacama desert (region),desierto de atacama,attacama desert,chile,atacama desert fog,atacama desert sky,atacama desert rcm,the atacama desert,atacama desert city,atacama desert trip,atacama desert vlog,atacama desert piano,atacama desert video,atacama desert music,atacama desert hindi,atacama desert chile,atacama desert party,atacama desert level 2

Atacama Desert

One of the driest places on Earth, Chile’s Atacama Desert is an otherworldly experience.
  Chile’s Atacama Desert is one of the most inhospitable places on the planet a land where sand stretches into salt, volcanoes take their place alongside snow-capped mountains, and the wind and ghost towns are kept company by occasional lagoons.
  At the centre of it all is San Pedro, the oasis settlement at the heart of the Atacama community, 11,000 years in the making. The locals mastered this brutal terrain, terracing the mountains, rearing llama and alpaca, and harvesting figs, pumpkins, corn and other produce. Today, San Pedro’s narrow dirt streets are lined with adobe houses, restaurants, hotels and shops a leaping-off point for ventures into the great beyond.
  Nearby, the badlands mutate into a lunar landscape at the aptly named Moon Valley. Here, the great Andes and the Atacama desert sculpted by the elements over millions of years are kissed by the fading sun, bursting into colour 2,550 metres (8,366 feet) above sea level.
  Further afield, at Death Valley, the desert earns its stripes, hurtling humongous dunes heavenward alongside restless mountains; rock upon rock upon sand. A brutal expanse rolled out towards the horizon,  also goes by the name Mars Valley, where many try their hands at sandboarding, mountain biking and trekking.
  From space, the journey continues to hell, with the geyser fields of El Tatio where steam rises from scorched earth keeping the chubby viscachas (cousins of the chinchilla), camelid vicuñas and emu-like rheas at bay. The smoking wasteland is anything but, sprouting giant cacti and yaretas, which ooze like giant broccoli from the sand. Dialling back the intensity, the local hot springs boast mineral-rich waters, mud baths and mini-waterfalls.
  Soon after, the earth unfolds into an open expanse of white ground, interspersed with thin pools reflecting the mountains in the distance. This is Salar de Atacama, the country’s largest salt flat, home to numerous species of flamingo and part of the Los Flamencos National Reserve. At 4,200 meters (13,780 feet) above sea level, this is serious headache territory, but nothing a float in the turquoise Cejar Lagoon can’t fix.
  At Rainbow Valley a natural solarium, where the stars are laid bare by the lightless night hills of red, green and yellow compete for glory. Scattered across the dry landscape are a handful of ruins from past Atacaman civilisations, such as the pre-Incan; hilltop Quitor Fort; and Lasana, a fortress built along the Loa River.
  While the region’s petroglyphs, or rock art, date back 10,000 years, among its more unlikely cultural treasures are its various ghost towns left in the wake of the former saltpeter industry, which for 60 years drew workers from across Chile, Peru and Bolivia. The industry, spread over 200 works, sprouted its own Pampino culture, leaving behind empty, creaky and clanging towns, such as Humberstone, which has been converted into an open-air museum, centred around a restored (allegedly haunted) theatre.

best place to go in hawaii for the first time

-
hawaii,things to do in hawaii,hawaii vlog,best island to visit in hawaii for first time,first time in hawaii,traveling to hawaii,hawaii travel,best things to do in maui,hawaii vacation,flying for the first time,things to do in hawaii for families,best things to do in hawaii,best things to eat in hawaii,living in hawaii,best things in maui,first time hawaii where to go

best place to go in hawaii for the first time

Enjoy a warm welcome in the USA's pacific island paradise.
  Aloha. Not only is Hawaii's most famous word used as a greeting, it also means love 7 land compassion. It's an apt expression, since most visitors fall in love at their first sight of the Aloha State.
  Nearly every visitor will begin their Hawaiian adventure at the airport or cruise terminal of the state capital, Honolulu. This city of one million is the urban heart of Hawaii; seven times bigger than the next largest town with some threequarters of resident Hawaiians calling it home. Here you'll immediately spot a sea of Hawaiian shirts, the colourful clothing that has become the region's most famous export. Tourist shops have gaudy prints in abundance to make wearers look like a modern-day John Candy or Magnum PI, but most resident Hawaiians choose a more restrained version in which the design is printed on the inside of the fabric to create a more muted look.
  On the western fringes of Honolulu is Pearl Harbor, the US naval base that was seared into history on 7 December 1941, "a date that will live in infamy" according to then-president Franklin Roosevelt. A surprise Japanese attack damaged all eight battleships anchored in the harbour and sank eight other ships. Countless ground installations and buildings were destroyed, and nearly 2,500 Americans were killed. All this before their country had even declared war.
  Nearly eight decades on, the centrepiece of Pearl Harbor is the USS Arizona Memorial, a pontoon building that floats above the wreck of the only battleship not to be raised after the attack. Accessed by boat from the harbourside, the memorial is a moving tribute. A marble wall listing the names of the 1,177 victims who lost their lives when the ship sank, an opening in the floor overlooks the water above the ship’s decks. Occasional oil slicks often referred to as the “tears of the Arizona” are a poignant reminder that the USS Arizona still sits just a few metres below the surface, the last resting place of more than 1,100 servicemen whose bodies have never been recovered.
  In 1999, USS Missouri the vessel on which a Japanese delegation surrendered in 1945 was moved to Pearl Harbor and berthed close to the Arizona memorial, meaning that the start and end of American involvement in World War II are commemorated in one place. Visitors are able to tour the Missouri, and also USS Bowfin, a 1940s submarine. Ford Island, in the middle of the harbour, is home to the Pacific Aviation Museum and a collection of restored fighter planes. Plan to spend a full day here if you wish to do Pearl Harbor justice.
  With the history visited, it’s time to hit the beach. Conveniently, one of the best in the world is located just 19 kilometres (12 miles) away: Waikiki Beach. Within strolling distance of Downtown Honolulu, Waikiki is actually a series of eight distinct beaches of powder-soft white sand running for a couple of kilometres in front of the boardwalk, behind which sit an array of hotels, bars and restaurants. Most of the hotels offer a luau, a traditional feast encompassing a buffet, music, hula and other Polynesian entertainments. Burn off the calories with a spot of snorkelling at Fort DeRussy Beach, where a coral reef sits just beyond the waves, or take a surfing lesson at Kuhio Beach.
  Most postcards of Waikiki Beach feature the sand in the foreground and Diamond Head in the background. This towering hill is a reminder of Hawaii’s volcanic origins. Diamond Head is an extinct crater, and it’s a tough climb up the solidified lava with plenty of steps. It’s best left to those with strong legs and a head for heights, but the view across Honolulu and the Pacific for those who do reach the summit makes the burning thighs worthwhile.
  Those who venture away from busy Honolulu and Oahu find that the pace of life is slower, but natural wonders are just as impressive. On the island of Maui, rent a car and drive the road to Hana. This 80-kilometre (50-mile) stretch winds along the coast and can be done in a couple of hours, but it is best to take all day to admire the beaches and lush waterfalls that run downhill from Koolau Forest Reserve. Beyond Hana, the road surface is suitable only for off-road vehicles, but it does lead to the Oheo Gulch Pools. Canny tourist operators nicknamed these the Seven Sacred Pools, although they’re not actually sacred and there are far more than seven. Still, don’t let that stop you enjoying a dip in the clear waters, and swimming beneath the waterfalls  that feed the pools.
  The island of Hawaii (Big Island to the locals) is, unsurprisingly, the largest in the archipelago. Hotfoot it to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, the best place to explore the islands’ fiery beginnings. Marvel at the steamy spectacle of Kilauea, one of the most active volcanoes in the world, by cruising the Crater Rim Drive. Then enjoy an unusual underground view of a volcano by walking through the Thurston Lava Tube, which was emptied of molten rock a few centuries ago. However, be aware that this is still an active volcanic zone, and roads are often closed due to lava flows and ongoing eruptions.
  Those in search of further adventures can explore Waimea Canyon and the Na Pali Coast State Park on the garden isle of Kauai, the former leper colony on the friendly isle of Molokai, or the traditional culture of the pineapple isle of Molokai once wholly owned by the Hawaiian Pineapple Company to grow the exotic fruit.
  However, it’s a mistake to cram too much in to a Hawaiian trip. Don’t forget to leave to time do very little. With 1,210 kilometres (750 miles) of coastline, every island has a surplus of beaches to choose from. Soak up the year-round sun, sip a cocktail and enjoy the hospitality of Hawaii’s famously friendly people. After all, this is the  Aloha State, best enjoyed the aloha way.

visiting denali national park

-
denali national park,denali,national park,denali national park and preserve (protected site),denali national park and preserve,denali national park alaska,park,national,visiting denali national park and preserve,denali national park map,mount denali,denali national park area,denali national park 2019,denali national park tours,denali national park hotels,tips for traveling to denali national park

visiting denali national park

Explore the rugged wilderness of the USA’s cold north.
  The home of the tallest mountain in North America, Denali National Park named after the 6,190-metre (20,310-foot) peak is a semi-Arctic wilderness roughly the same size as the entire land area of Massachusetts. Visitors with keen eyes are likely to see grizzly bears, caribou and moose. Those with luck on their side might spot wolves, black bears and wolverines.
  Considering its vast size, almost 20,000 square kilometres (7,700 square miles), Denali National Park contains only one road with a handful of destinations marked by mileposts. Private motorists can go as far as the Savage River Trailhead at mile 15 before being turned around, but most visitors stop at the Wilderness Access Center at the start of the road to buy a ticket for the buses that travel its full 146-kilometre (91-mile) length. Tour buses offer a guaranteed seat and a set itinerary, whereas shuttle buses will stop on request to set down and pick up passengers at the side of the road. Many of the shuttle-bus drivers are just as happy to share their love of the national park as their tour-bus equivalents, although prospective passengers may have to be patient until a bus with space aboard arrives.
  All should aim to make it as far as Eielson Visitor Center at mile 66. This eight-hour round trip on the unpaved road might be tough on the buttocks, but it includes one of the most dramatic views of Denali. Even if the mountain is shrouded in cloud a common occurrence during the summer months it is a majestic sight. If the mountain is fully out, take full advantage and go crazy with your camera.
  Photographers with stamina might like to extend their journey to mile 86 and Wonder Lake. A short distance away is Reflection Pond, possibly the best place to shoot images of the mountain when it peeks out from the mist. A little closer to home, at mile 46, is Polychrome Pass. This multicoloured bluff is particularly spectacular at dusk, and a dedicated shuttle bus departs the Visitor Center daily at around 5pm.
  If the thought of a day on a bus seat doesn’t appeal, why not step off the bus and into the wilderness? There are surprisingly few marked trails, so most hikers simply pick their own path. The sparse vegetation of the flat tundra and taiga forest makes it difficult to get lost, although those who choose to push further into the park may go for hours, even days, without seeing another person. There are campsites and lodges to rest at night, although be sure to book a spot at the Wilderness Access Center beforehand since spaces fill up quickly. Ensure you take plenty of supplies with you, as there are few services within the park itself.
  Whether you choose off-road adventure in the backcountry or the comparative comfort of on-road travel, you’ll be left with memories and photographs galore of the stunning scenery and wondrous wildlife of Denali National Park.

visiting monteverde costa rica

-
costa rica,monteverde costa rica,monteverde,costa rica (country),costa rica vacation,monteverde cloud forest,costa rica travel,costa rica cloud forest,what to do in monteverde costa rica,hiking costa rica,monteverde (city/town/village),what to do in costa rica,costa rica travel vlog,costa rica travel guide,things to do in costa rica,santa elena costa rica,san jose costa rica,puntarenas costa rica

visiting monteverde costa rica

At Costa Rica’s misty ‘green mountain’ oasis, you’ll feel as though you’re on cloud nine.
  While Costa Rica may be known for its rich coffee, beautiful beaches and incredible wildlife, you haven’t experienced the country’s ‘pura vida’(pure life and enjoyment) until you’ve visited Monteverde. The word Monteverde translates as ‘green mountain’, a fitting name considering the lush-green cloud forests the town is known for. Located in the northwest of Costa Rica in the Cordillera de Tilaran mountain range, the area has three cloud forests, which offer an experience unlike any other.
  The most famous of these is The Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve. Established in 1972, the reserve became popular with tourists after a 1983 National Geographic article dubbed it a mecca for bird lovers. It's now not only one of the most visited areas in Costa Rica, but one of the rarest habitats on Earth.
  This tropical jungle paradise is a natural wonder. At 1.440 metres (4.662 feet) above sea level, there's a constant mist in the forest, which looks like clouds enveloping the towering treetops, it's simply spectacular. This unique microclimate and the humidity it creates is what makes this verdant forest flourish. One of the best things about Monteverde’s cooling mist is that unlike in most tropical forests you won’t suffer from the heat.
  The area, which covers 14,200 hectares (35,089 acres), is made up of eight different biological zones and is home to five per cent of the world’s biodiversity. This includes more than 2,500 plants (with 425 different orchids), 400 bird species, and more than 100 mammals. It’s a wildlife paradise abundant with sloths, toucans, jaguars and monkeys. But the hidden gems to search for are the resplendent quetzal. one of the world's most beautiful birds, and the endemic rare golden toad.
  The Cloud Forest Reserve is a three-hour drive from San José, and is a must for anyone visiting Costa Rica. Only three per cent of the forest is open to visitors, making it truly special. There are 13 kilometres (eight miles) of trails to explore with hanging bridges and hidden waterfalls leading you through the evergreen forest. It's worth going early in the morning if you're looking to spot some of its wild inhabitants or try a night Walk for something completely different. A guide is also recommended if you want to maximise what you see and learn on your trip.
  If you’re an adventurer, you can view the scenery from a different perspective with an adrenaline boost. The forest is renowned for its canopy tours and ziplining. Fly through the air Superman-style on the 1,590-metre (5,216-foot) long zipline, the longest in Latin America, or fall for 45 metres (148 feet) on the Tarzan swing. If  you can bear to open your eyes, it’s breathtaking in more ways than one. For the less daring, the Sky Tram also offers stunning vistas.
  If you’re not a fan of crowds, the smaller Santa Elena Cloud Forest Reserve is less busy, although you won’t see the quetzal here. And if you have time, the Children’s Eternal Rainforest, which is six times as big, is also worth hiking.
  A few kilometres away, the peaceful town of Santa Elena is the best place to visit to shop and try local Tico food. Foodies can take the Don Juan coffee plantation tour to discover how chocolate, sugar cane juice and coffee are made. If you haven’t had enough adventure, there’s horseback riding or canyoning and plenty more to keep you entertained.
  Whether you’re an adventurer, a birdwatcher, a hiker or a foodie, a trip to Monteverde is sure to be true bliss.

grand canyon tours

-
grand canyon,grand canyon tour,grand canyon (tourist attraction),grand canyon national park,canyon,grand canyon south rim,grand canyon national park (protected site),grand canyon tours,grand canyon bus tour,grand canyon tour company,west rim grand canyon,grand,grand canyon west,grand canyon day trip,antelope canyon tours,grand canyon helicopter tour,grand canyon arizona,grand canyon west rim

grand canyon tours

Marvel at the beauty of this natural slice through southwest USA.
  Surprisingly, the Grand Canyon doesn’t set many records. It isn’t the longest, nor the widest, not even the deepest. However, it is by far the most famous, so much so that many people simply call it The Canyon as though there were no others in the world.
  Multicoloured layers of rock sink into the earth, forming a chasm that gives the impression it must have been created by tectonic plates tearing apart. However, this slice through the United States was created over several million years geologists still argue exactly how long ago when the Colorado River meandered across what is now north Arizona. Erosion from the flowing water combined with the uplift of the Colorado Plateau to carve a mile-deep canyon. The rocks that are left behind were once covered by the waters of a warm, shallow sea or swampland, but now shimmer under the sun in a hot, dry desert.  
  For those interested in the statistics, the Grand Canyon stretches for 446 kilometres (277 miles), reaches 29 kilometres (18 miles) at its widest and measures 1,857 metres (6,093 feet) at its deepest. Nobody will ever see the whole thing in one visit, but it is possible to take in the majesty and grandeur in a day or two. 
  The popular sites of the South Rim may be busy, but they draw the crowds for a reason. Grand Canyon Village, with a number of wooden buildings dating to the turn of the 20th century, gives a glimpse of canyon country in the final days of the American Frontier. From here, Hermit Road runs west for 11 kilometres (eight miles) to the stone-built Hermit’s Rest. Those who are keen to hike a portion of the Canyon will find this the easiest way to get their boots dusty: jump on board the free shuttle bus to Hermit’s Rest and walk back to Grand Canyon Village along the Rim Trail. For those who prefer to see their natural wonders from the comfort of a seat, hop on and off the buses to your heart’s content at the designated stops and viewpoints.
  The quieter Desert View Drive, heading east from Grand Canyon Village, is the best way to escape the tourist hordes. This 40-kilometre (25-mile) road does not have a shuttle bus service so relies on visitors having their own wheels, but it includes six viewpoints and five unmarked pullover points. Don’t miss Navajo Point and Lipan Point, two places where the dusky red layers of rock can be seen at their best. The road ends at the Desert View Watchtower, just beyond the stunning Tusayan Ruins. These are the eerie remains of a Puebloan village, first constructed nearly 1,000 years ago by around 20 Native Americans who called this land home.
  Coachloads of tourists go no further than the viewpoints of the South Rim, but it’s difficult to look down the steep walls of the Grand Canyon and not wonder what is down there. Bright Angel Trail, beginning in Grand Canyon Village, drops 1,340 metres (4,380 feet) over 13 kilometres (eight miles) to the banks of the Colorado River at the bottom of the cliffs. Given the nature of the descent, expect seemingly endless switchbacks and aching knees, although at least it’s only another three kilometres (two miles) to the comfortable beds at Phantom Ranch, the only lodge beyond the rim.
  Only 16 kilometres (ten miles) from Grand Canyon Village as the crow flies, but a five-hour drive around the gorge, North Rim is the quieter side of Grand Canyon with only ten per cent of the park’s visitors venturing across. It makes it the ideal place to seek sanctuary from the crowds. The north is also the colder side since it is around 300 metres (1,000 feet) higher than the South Rim. While those on the North Rim can be stood in falling snow, others far below might be sunbathing along the river bank.
  It is now 150 years since John Wesley Powell led the first expedition through Grand Canyon in 1869 to explore an unknown section on American maps. Those who want to follow the trailblazing path of the pioneers should join one of the waterborne excursions leaving Lee’s Ferry in the summer months. Itineraries range from a few days to a few weeks, and you can experience the Colorado River by whitewater rafting through rapids, peaceful paddling up little-known side canyons, and exploring Native American ruins only accessible by river.
  But perhaps the best way to really appreciate the scale of the Grand Canyon is from the air. Scenic flights by helicopter and aeroplane leave from Grand Canyon Airport on South Rim, while others depart from Las Vegas, enabling visitors to Sin City to glimpse the Grand Canyon between trips to the gaming tables. Passengers who are lucky enough to find themselves on board are able to marvel at the sheer immensity of the gorge, carved by the seemingly peaceful ribbon of river within it.
  To limit noise and ensure passenger safety, the National Park Service limits the number of flights and no longer allows them to dip below the rim. However, some helicopter excursions do land within the Canyon on the Havasupai and Hualapai Reservations, located outside National Park jurisdiction.
  The Havasupai portion of the Canyon is home to the spectacular waterfalls of Havasu Creek, a tributary of the Colorado. For sheer beauty, this is one of the finest places in the region. The Hiking trails run along the rims and down the steep sides oftheCanyon star attraction of the Hualapai Reservation is the Grand Canyon Skywalk, a glass-bottomed, horseshoe-shaped walkway that extends 21 metres (70 feet) over the rim. It may not be a comfortable experience for those who are afraid of heights, but the makers claim it will hold the weight of 70 Boeing 747 aeroplanes. Although if the glass did smash, expect a long fall all those jets could all sit on top of each other and still not reach the rim, such is the depth of the most famous canyon in the world.